Carthago-Delenda-Est

What is Classical Civilisations like bc I'm thinking of taking it as an A- Level? Would really help :) from grayson-manor

It completely depends which modules you’re taking (ask your teacher what they’re thinking of teaching next year), but it can be superfun! There are a lot of options which they might take - I did the Odyssey, the Aeneid, Greek Tragedy, and Greek architecture and sculpture, if I remember rightly, and they were good fun. It’s a great introduction to the wider world of Classics, as is Ancient History. 

Do remember that a-levels depend hugely upon teachers and teaching styles - if you think you’re going to hate the person teaching it, it might well be worth considering if that’s worth it. You’re going to be spending a lot of time with them, and if you’re hating every moment it’s going to be tough. And also what you’re planning to do later on - I know it’s tough thinking about university now, but you should 100% be vaguely thinking about your next step. 


interretialia:

valerie-an:

linguisten:

"Grammar" does not "make sense". No language’s grammar is more or less "sensible" or "logical" than another’s.
Grammar is a set of arbitrary rules that became conventionalized and passed on more or less precisely over scores of generations. 

Plus, Latin grammar seems more regimented than in most languages because we focus on studying classical Latin. Classical Latin is formal language most often used among the patrician class, especially in politics and literature. It was subject to prescriptivist monitoring and therefore evolved fewer nonstandard forms. Vulgar, or nonstandard Latin, was used by most Romans in speech, but rarely in writing.

Bona puncta. Good points.
There is a difference between a Schrodinger’s cat-like literary language and a spoken and written language that has now so many native speakers.

interretialia:

valerie-an:

linguisten:

"Grammar" does not "make sense". No language’s grammar is more or less "sensible" or "logical" than another’s.

Grammar is a set of arbitrary rules that became conventionalized and passed on more or less precisely over scores of generations. 

Plus, Latin grammar seems more regimented than in most languages because we focus on studying classical Latin. Classical Latin is formal language most often used among the patrician class, especially in politics and literature. It was subject to prescriptivist monitoring and therefore evolved fewer nonstandard forms. Vulgar, or nonstandard Latin, was used by most Romans in speech, but rarely in writing.

Bona puncta. Good points.

There is a difference between a Schrodinger’s cat-like literary language and a spoken and written language that has now so many native speakers.

(Source: latin-student-problems)


Damaged Pompeii to receive Italy rescue fund →

museumofclassicalantiquities:

archaeologicalnews:image

Italy says it will unblock 2m euros (£1.6m) in emergency funding to save the ancient city of Pompeii, after flooding caused walls to collapse.

A number of structures, including the Temple of Venus and Roma, were damaged by heavy rainfall on Sunday and Monday.

The decay prompted calls for action from the European Union and the United Nations.

The site, where volcanic ash smothered a Roman city in AD79, has suffered slow degradation for many years.

It is one of the world’s greatest archaeological treasures. Read more.


sherdoor:

smallnico:

if you were a twin in ancient rome they would name the firstborn and then name the secondborn after the firstborn

except 

if your older twin’s name was geminus, your name would be anti-geminus

that is the equivalent of naming your children steve and not steve

Source? Because Commodus (Lucius Aurelius Commodus Antoninus) had a twin brother named Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (who died at the age of four :c ). He actually had several pairs of twin siblings: brothers who died young, Titus Aurelius Antoninus and Tiberius Aelius Aurelius, and possibly a brother/sister pair where the brother died young. Although conventions changed - it’s a thousand years+ of history! - the eldest son would be typically named after their father, then the second after a grandfather/uncle, and likewise for daughters but feminised.