Carthago-Delenda-Est

national-archaeological-museum:

Relief depicting Dionysos:

The frame and the holes of the attachment indicated that it served as wall decoration. On a kline, a poet and his mistress recline. In front them stands a table with food. On the low pedestal there are masks and rolls. Leaning on a satyr approaches Dionysos, while another satyr is loosening the god’s sandals. A curtain separates the epiphany of the god from the urban area at the back. Four satyrs and a maenad completed the relief on the right. The scene represents the visit of Dionysos and his thiasos to a victorious poet, a new composition that emerged in the “neoattic” workshops around 100 B.C. Pentelic Marble. (early 1st century B.C) (former Louisa Streit Collection) 

You will note that during the roman influence in Greece, religious subjects acquire a romanticised character and the presence of divinity lacks elements of worship. However, both votive reliefs and decorative ones give tremendous insight about the structure and themes of graeco-roman painting and provide the missing link in the transition between the painting of the antiquity and byzantine iconography.


interretialia:


Linguae Latinae Tabula Fluendi

Latin Flowchart
(Fons!)

interretialia:


Linguae Latinae Tabula Fluendi

Latin Flowchart
(Fons!)

for reference: 
Original Latin
Cenabis bene, mi Fabulle, apud mepaucis, si tibi di favent, diebus,si tecum attuleris bonam atque magnamcenam, non sine candida puellaet vino et sale et omnibus cachinnis.Haec si, inquam, attuleris, venuste noster,cenabis bene; nam tui Catulliplenus sacculus est aranearum.Sed contra accipies meros amores,seu quid suavius elegantiusve est:nam unguentum dabo, quod meae puellaedonarunt Veneres Cupidinesque;quod tu cum olfacies, deos rogabistotum ut te faciant, Fabulle, nasum.
Basic English Translation (there are better funnier ones! but they play a lot looser with the text because you have to - here’s a nice set of translations and readings)
My dear Fabullus, you will dine well at my housein a few days if the gods favor you,and if you bring with you a great and good dinner,not without a pure girland wine and salt and all the jokes.If you bring these, I say, our charming one,you will dine well—for your Catullus’spurse is full of cobwebs.But in return you will receive pure loveor that which is sweeter and more elegant:for I will give perfume, which the Lovesand Charms gave to my girl,and when you smell it, you will ask the godsthat they make you, oh Fabullus, all nose. View Larger

interretialia:

Linguae Latinae Tabula Fluendi

Latin Flowchart

(Fons!)

interretialia:

Linguae Latinae Tabula Fluendi

Latin Flowchart

(Fons!)

for reference: 

Original Latin

Cenabis bene, mi Fabulle, apud me
paucis, si tibi di favent, diebus,
si tecum attuleris bonam atque magnam
cenam, non sine candida puella
et vino et sale et omnibus cachinnis.
Haec si, inquam, attuleris, venuste noster,
cenabis bene; nam tui Catulli
plenus sacculus est aranearum.
Sed contra accipies meros amores,
seu quid suavius elegantiusve est:
nam unguentum dabo, quod meae puellae
donarunt Veneres Cupidinesque;
quod tu cum olfacies, deos rogabis
totum ut te faciant, Fabulle, nasum.

Basic English Translation (there are better funnier ones! but they play a lot looser with the text because you have to - here’s a nice set of translations and readings)

My dear Fabullus, you will dine well at my house
in a few days if the gods favor you,
and if you bring with you a great and good dinner,
not without a pure girl
and wine and salt and all the jokes.
If you bring these, I say, our charming one,
you will dine well—for your Catullus’s
purse is full of cobwebs.
But in return you will receive pure love
or that which is sweeter and more elegant:
for I will give perfume, which the Loves
and Charms gave to my girl,
and when you smell it, you will ask the gods
that they make you, oh Fabullus, all nose.


No single Greek god even approaches Dionysus in the horror of his epithets, which near witness to a savagery that is absolutely without mercy… He is called the “render of men”, “the eater of raw flesh”, “who delights in the sword and bloodshed”. We hear not only of human sacrifice in his cult, but also of the ghastly ritual in which a man is torn to pieces. Where does this put us? Surely there can be no further doubt that this puts us into death’s sphere. The terrors of destruction, which make all if life tremble, belong also, as horrible desire, to the kingdom of Dionysus. The monster whose supernatural duality speaks to us from the mask has one side of his nature turned toward eternal night.

— Walter F. Otto, Dionysus: Myth and Cult (via argonauticae)